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Ever heard of the 25% rule? If you’re scratching your head, you’re not alone. Many FOG ordinances, enforced by City Water Authorities throughout the United States, make reference to the 25% rule in the context of grease trap maintenance. But what exactly does this rule mean? What is the 25% Rule? A grease trap plays

Did you know? Restaurants produce up to 450kg of grease per month!  This grease must be properly disposed, captured and recycled at the source to avoid having to deal with costly problems such as clogged pipes and plumbing issues. Grease Guardian is an automatic grease interceptor that recovers all the fats, oils and grease (FOG)

Grease recycling: Is there a difference between fryer oil and grease trap oil? Any fast food outlet or catering facility producing large quantities of food will produce grease as a byproduct from the cooking process. The grease must be responsibly managed for environmental reasons, grease traps are the best solution for safely managing FOG. Is

You would have generally heard people using the terms grease trap and grease interceptor synonymously. It is true that both the equipment are used as grease removal units that keep the FOG out of the drainage line of any food establishment by capturing it. But technically, there is a marked difference between a grease trap

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Having a bad odour in your kitchen leaves a bad impression and if you are running a restaurant then it will also affect your business. Most commonly, those nauseating smells are nothing but the grease trap odour. Grease traps work efficiently to separate the FOG from wastewater, prevent sewer blockages and reduces the chances of

Grease is a sticky, oily, slimy substance with a complicated chemical structure that is formed from oil, thickener and additives. Fats, oils and greases, which are commonly referred to as FOG are so notorious that they can wreak havoc on the entire drainage system of a city. And this havoc can seriously take its toll

Whether you own a restaurant, a small pub, a multi-storeyed hotel or a supermarket, a significant part of the food waste generated in your facility is FOG. These fats, oils, and greases are a high-lipid waste and an untapped source of hydrocarbons that can be chemically treated to produce biofuel. And to most of the

Each time you cook, there is always some amount of grease leftover and hence it is an inevitable byproduct of a restaurant’s kitchen. Trapping of grease in the sewage system is a universal problem faced by hotels, restaurants and other corporate buildings. In 2013, 62% of 15,000 sewer backups in New York were caused due

The commercial kitchen tends to focus more on food that’s going to be served at the customer’s table. Of course, that should be the first priority for any commercial catering environment. But what about the oils, fats, and grease that are leftover after you are done with the serving? Whether you’re frying, sauteing or even

A number of food service businesses around the world have dealt with unpleasant consequences of grease traps. The most common reasons are a malfunctioning or an overflowing grease trap. In both the cases, chances are that either there is a lack of regular maintenance or the installed grease interceptor does not meet the requirements completely.